Monthly Archives: July 2008

Bruce Springsteen live at Giants Stadium 7/27

My 99th concert happened last Sunday at Giants Stadium, featuring New Jersey rock legends, Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. This was actually only the first time I caught the boss live; I came close in 2003 but had a conflict with work.

The parking lot before the show was intense. People of all ages were partying from early morning until the show began. Apparently the New Jersey police don’t mind alcohol being consumed by everybody (all ages) in the parking lot when Springsteen is in town. As oppose to Jones Beach, where everything must be hidden in a cup, and if one looks questionably underage, are harassed by park police, followed by a beer ticket.

Bruce played for over 3 hours which is one of the longest performances I have witnessed. The longest I have seen was Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young at Madison Square Garden; They played for close to 4 hours, I wanted to hang myself. Bruce was different though. I didn’t want the concert to end. I wanted to see what he would have played next.

The highlights of the show were “Atlantic City,” “Growin Up,” “The Promised Land,” “The Rising,” and the opener, “10 Avenue Freeze Out.”


I am happy to have finally checked this rock legend off my list.

Celebrating Rock Concert #100 Tomorrow!

I just realized that I am meeting a personal milestone tomorrow evening with my 100th rock concert. The rock band is Poison and the venue is Jones Beach on Long Island.

This is the 100th real rock show for me according to the best of my knowledge. My list does not include local rock bands or shows that I have played through the years.

I figure since this is show #100, that I would do a series of posts over the next few weeks that reflect on some of the highlights that I have experienced since 1986.

Kerrang! Iron Maiden tribute rules!

I have been listening to the Kerrang! Iron Maiden Tribute, Maiden Heaven, and it is GREAT! I know, I know, Iron Maiden can’t be covered, blah blah blah…but there are some great versions on this CD.

My favorites from the tribute are “Remember Tomorrow” (Metallica), “The Trooper” (Coheed & Cambria), “To Tame A Land” (Dream Theater), and “Hallowed Be Thy Name” (Machine Head). The other covers are great too, like the ones by DevilDriver, Black Tide, Avenged, and Trivium.

The only problem with this CD is that it is not easy to get, legally. It is a free CD with the July 16 issue of Kerrang! magazine, but that can be tough to find. The Kerrang! website doesn’t have an easy way of purchasing the issue and it is hard to find a Barnes & Noble or Borders book store with a copy in stock. Not to mention, the US to pound exchange rate is currently not in our favor if purchased online. However, if you have a way of getting the album, I would grab it in a sec.

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Listen To New Alice Cooper Album Now, For Free

Many thanks to reid of hellflavored.com for bringing this to my attention:

The new Alice Cooper album, Along Came a Spider, is available for free streaming on his myspace page now, before the release. Sweet! Click the link below.

http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewprofile&friendid=23417929

Remember, these free streams are usually temporary and disappear quickly.

James Hetfield still prefers Robert Trujillo over Newstead

In an interview, by VG TV [via blabbermouth.net], yesterday James Hetfield of Metallica continued to put down Jason Newstead:

James Hetfield: “I don’t really have to say it, but I will — he’s an amazing bass player; very competent. He can play pretty much anything we throw at him. Not only that, but obviously [Robert] playing with his fingers brings a fuller sound. He — and no disrespect to Jason [Newsted, Rob‘s predecessor in METALLICA] — but Rob has already written more on this album than Jason had in his whole 14 years. A lot of that had to do with us not being willing, and I totally understand that, but just his material seemed to gel better. It feels as though we’ve known him forever, basically, is what it feels like. And there’s still times when I see him in pictures with us, and I go, ‘Oh, yeah! He’s in our band. Dude, we kick ass even more now.’ It’s a good feeling.”

I agree that Trujillo is a sick bass player, but come on, it was Jason singing “Seek & Destroy” and running around the stage like a lunatic that made their shows so awesome. Of course Trujillo has the talent, that is why Ozzy hired him, and kept him for so long, but he just lacks the presence of Newstead. It’s time to face that, James.

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Steven Adler of Gn'R fame on VH1's "Sober Living"

If you enjoyed Jeff Conaway messed up life on “Celebrity Fit Club” and “Celebrity Rehab” with Dr. Drew, you probably shouldn’t miss the new show “Sober Living.”

Steven Adler, original drummer of Guns ‘n’ Roses, recently confirmed his plans to take part in this show, according to blabbermouth.net. No word on when it will air yet.

Adler actually doesn’t look that awful, considering he has been out of the spotlight for 17 years. Then again, Axl has been out of the spotlight for about 15 years himself.

Addendum [12-21-08]: Adler is going back to rehab as ordered by a court commissioner in L.A. This news came just one day after graduating Dr. Drew’s VH1 show…bummer [news.yahoo.com].

Show him some love at his MySpace page: http://www.myspace.com/stevenadlersite

AC/DC announces title to new record

and it is…BLACK ICE to be released later this year as reported by Ultimate-Guitar.com.

I really hope they don’t try to coordinate this album with the new Rock Band video game. I am getting so sick of reading about bands doing that, most recently Guns n’ Roses (insert Axl Rose rant here); It is really lame.

Oh yeah…the release of Black Ice will be followed by a WORLD TOUR!!!

THUN-DER! Ah ah ah ah ah THUN-DER!

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Review: Judas Priest – Nostradamus [2008]

By Artem Altman

After 38 years, 16 studio albums, a breakup in 1991, Tim “Ripper” Owens, a reunion in 2003, Judas Priest has decided that now is a good time for a concept album.

Released on June 17th (in the United States), Nostradamus (Sony) is a product of Judas Priest’s exploration of a new musical frontier that falls short of what has long been expected of the “Metal Gods.” The two-disc set looks to be a disappointing follow up to the solid Angel of Retribution (2005), the bands album marking a triumphant return of Rob Halford to the Judas Priest line-up after his departure in 1991.

This concept album’s main focus is Michel de Nostredeme, a prophet known to contemporaries as Nostradamus. In his literary works, Nostradamus foretold what has been interpreted as the rise to power of Napoleon and Adolf Hitler, the French Revolution and the London Fire of 1666, along with many others prophesies.

Nostradamus is not the same album with the heavy and up-tempo style that has long been JP’s aggressive music style. Plain and simple, it lacks hit material. Tracks such as “Revelations,” “Pestilence and Plague,” “Persecution” and “Vision,” all standout on the album, but there is not enough for a major hit to come out of this one.

The band is able to incorporate the smooth song transitions that make for a harmonious track list, but both Glen Tipton’s and KK Downing’s skill and talent feel considerably underused. Die-hard Judas Priest fans are likely to be disappointed with greatly reserved tempos as they have come to expect from Tipton and Downing. The operatic orchestration of the album holds back Priest’s aggressive style. This album will leave anyone who is familiar with their catalog of the other 15 studio albums (13 if you don’t count Jugulator (1997) and Demolition (2001) of the Tip “Ripper” Owens era) wanting more.

The album failing to live up to its expectations should be of no surprise for Judas Priest fans. Released not long after the multi-platinum Screaming for Vengeance (1982), 1986’s Turbo was perceived by many a low point of Judas Priest’s music in the 80s, however, now it’s a much more appreciated album than it was upon its initial release. Perhaps, the same fate is in store for Nostradamus and Judas Priest’s foray into previously uncharted territory will be commended in the future, but this is more of an optimistic prognosis, rather than a prophesy.